Tagged: ebooks

Library resources for course development

Below are opportunities to learn more about new library resources that can help you develop content for your future courses.

Webinar: Atkins Library Streaming Video Search

Atkins Library’s diverse collection of streaming videos is meant to assist students with research and learning and provide faculty with supplementary materials for teaching. The library has created a separate search site for our streaming videos to highlight the collection and give our users a one stop shop for discovery and access to these unique collections.

This webinar will provide an overview of the different streaming media collections the library offers, a demonstration of our new video search site, and tips and tricks to optimally use these videos for research and teaching.

Webinar hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning

November 12 from 12:30-1:00 online
Register for the webinar and Browse the streaming video site

Workshop: Making the Most of Campus Access to NYTimes.com

Learn how the special features of our campus subscription to The New York Times in Education can enrich your curriculum and help foster students’ critical thinking, civic engagement, and global awareness. Users will find a variety of topics covered in depth through breaking news articles, blogs, videos and interactive features, as well as case studies, critical thinking discussion prompts, and other teaching tools you can adapt for use in class. The workshop will introduce these features and offer suggestions for making the most of this resource in class activities and assignments.

Workshop hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning

November 16 from 11:30-12:45 in Kennedy 221
Register for the workshop and Read about our campus subscription

Webinar: Atkins Library eTextbooks Program (recording)

Atkins Library understands the financial burden purchasing several textbooks for each semester can be for students. To help ease this burden, the Library has created the eTextbook program. This program allows professors to search the Library’s extensive list of unlimited user, DRM-free ebooks that are part of our collection, or could be purchased, for use as course adoption titles.

In this Webinar, you’ll find out about the program, see how to request these titles, and gain insight in how you can incorporate these titles in your classes. Andrew Harver, Department of Public Health Sciences, will also talk about his experience using the eTextbook program and using the library materials as part of his course readings.

Webinar was hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning

Listen to 30-minute webinar recording by clicking on “Webinar Playback”
Search the eTextbook Database and Watch a quick video to learn how it works

eBooks for Fall 2014

Textbook orders for the Summer and Fall semesters at UNC Charlotte are due to the bookstore by March 15.  Have you considered exploring the new library eBooks as potential course readings?  We now have access to thousands of eBooks from major university presses through Project Muse, Oxford Scholarship Online, IEEE Xplore (MIT Press eBooks Library), Springer, and other vendors.  There are no restrictions on the number of users that can read or download these eBooks at one time which makes them perfect for course use. Assigning library eBooks as course readings can also save students significant amounts of money.

Links to these eBook options can be found in the A-Z list of databases.

How to Search and Browse for eBooks in the Library Collection

Below are some tips to help you identify whether or not we own a specific title in eBook format, and discover other potential eBooks for your classes.

Search:

Catalog – The new library catalog allows you to easily search across all of our eBook holdings using keywords or titles.  Simply enter your keywords (ex. “Cold War Politics”), or the title in the search box, click on Search, and then limit your search results to “eBook” under Format.  Look for eBooks that include a “View Now” link.

Project Muse – Enter your search terms (ex. “Latin American Studies”) in the Advanced Search.  On the left side of the screen, under Content Type, select “Books”.

Oxford Scholarship Online – Enter your search terms (ex. Cold War) in the Search box and Search.  Under “Availability” on the left side of the screen, click on “Full Text.”

You may also explore options for browsing and searching in MIT Press eBooks Library and Springer.

Browse:

You can browse for books by subject in specific databases.

Project Muse – Click on the orange “Browse” button at the top of the screen.  Select your Research Area (ex. History) and then any sub areas (African History>Southern Africa). Then click on “Books” under “Content Type”.

Oxford Scholarship Online – Click on one of the options under “Browse by Subject” (ex. Political Science).  Under “Availability” on the left side of the screen, click on “Full Text.”

Questions?

Have questions about linking to these resources from your syllabi and/or Moodle? Looking for a specific title and unsure if we have it or can acquire it in eBook format?  Simply contact your Subject Librarian for assistance.

Please notify the library of any adoptions you make that are eBooks in the library’s catalog, including what course numbers and section(s) will be involved. Thanks!

eBooks as Textbooks

As you begin to craft your syllabi for the Spring semester, consider exploring the new library eBooks as potential course readings.  We now have access to thousands of eBooks from major university presses through Project Muse, Oxford Scholarship Online, and other vendors.  There are no restrictions on the number of users that can read or download these eBooks at one time which makes them perfect for course use. Using library eBooks as textbooks can also save students significant amounts of money.

How to Search and Browse for eBooks in the Library Collection

Search:

Catalog – The new library catalog allows you to easily search across all of our eBook holdings using keywords.  Simply enter your keywords in the search box (ex. “Cold War Politics”), click on Search, and then limit your search results to “eBook” under Format.  Look for eBooks that include a “View Now” link.

Project Muse – Enter your search terms (ex. Latin American Studies”) in the Advanced Search.  On the left side of the screen, under Content Type, select “Books”.

Oxford Scholarship Online – Enter your search terms (ex. Cold War) in the Search box and Search.  Under “Availability” on the left side of the screen, click on “Full Text.”

Browse:

You can browse for books by subject in specific databases.

Project Muse – Click on the orange “Browse” button at the top of the screen.  Select your Research Area (ex. History) and then any sub areas (African History>Southern Africa). Then click on “Books” under “Content Type”.

Oxford Scholarship Online – Click on one of the options under “Browse by Subject” (ex. Political Science).  Under “Availability” on the left side of the screen, click on “Full Text.”

If you have questions about linking to these resources from your syllabi and/or Moodle, simply contact your Subject Librarian for assistance.

Please notify the library of any adoptions you make that are eBooks in the library’s catalog, including what course numbers and section(s) will be involved.

Catalog: Tips & Tricks

OCLC WorldShareOn July 2 the library transitioned to a new integrated library system.  The system impacts how you find, discover, access and request library materials.

The new library catalog is a customized, local version of WorldCat that allows you to discover and access books, articles and more from our collection and beyond.

Below are a few tips and tricks to help you get started:

  1. Known-Item Searches – These are searches where you know the exact title of an article, book or other material.  TIP: Use quotation marks!
  2. Browsing eBooks – Conduct your search and select the “eBook” limiter on the left side of the screen. Any book with a “View Now” link (including those that do not show holdings in Atkins Library) is from one of our eBook collections.
  3. Browsing Streaming Media – Conduct your search and select the “eVideo” limiter on the left side of the screen. Any video with a “View Now” link is from one of our new streaming media collections.
  4. Limiting Search to Atkins – The default is set to search “Libraries Worldwide” but you can change the scope to “J. Murrey Atkins Library” once in the catalog or through the Advanced Search. Changing the scope will provide an accurate display of print holdings at Atkins Library but will exclude many electronic resources from your search results that are available to you.
  5. Interlibrary Loan – Interlibrary loan requests are much easier in the new system but you can still use the manual ILL form if you encounter problems.
  6. Book Delivery Service* – Click on “Request Item” to have an available item in Atkins Library sent to you via campus mail. If a book is not listed as “available” your best option is to use ILL or call the circulation desk for other options.

* This only applies to faculty and staff.

We know that some problems may occur during the implementation phase and we appreciate your patience as we work to resolve them.  If you encounter problems, please report them to 704.687.0494 or contact your subject librarian directly.

New eBook Collections

Atkins Library recently negotiated contracts to acquire large e-book collections from major university presses.

Project Muse LogoUPCC/Project Muse eBook Collection
Newly published e-books in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Ultimately 2,290 new e-books from 2013 will be released and available on Project Muse over the year as well as retrospective Project Muse e-book collections (about 23,000 e-books). Click on BROWSE and then the Books tab and select ‘Only content I have full access to’ on the left. Books will be searchable in the library’s catalog when records are available.

View the complete list of publishers represented in the collection.

Harvard University Press
Collection of all books published 2011-2013 in e-book format. We will no longer receive HUP print titles automatically, but will purchase them selectively as requested by library users. Titles are downloadable and there are no simultaneous user restrictions.

Oxford Scholarship Online
Collection of more than 2,400 titles published in 2013 from Oxford University Press, University of Chicago Press, and other leading university pressesOxford Scholarship provides access to thousands of academic monographs, in 20 subject areas across the humanities, social sciences, sciences, medicine, and law. Limit your search results to “Full Text” to view accessible titles.

Other eBook Collections
The library recently acquired e-book collections relevant to the STEM disciplines, including titles from Elsevier (via ScienceDirect), MIT Press (via IEEE) and SPIE Digital Library.

What does this mean for you as faculty?

  • These books can be viewed online and are compatible with most browsers.  They can also be downloaded to personal e-readers, such as Kindles and iPads.*
  • There are no simultaneous user restrictions on these titles which means multiple people can be reading and downloading these books at the same time.
  • Whereas sometimes you may have had to wait for already checked out and requested books, you will now have immediate access to the full text of these publications online.
  • If we have purchased a title that you use in your class(es), you and your students will all have full text access to these titles online.
  • Project Muse book chapters have a unique URL that you can share with your students but you will need to add the ezproxy (https://librarylink.uncc.edu/login?url=) to the front of the link to make them accessible from off-campus.
  • Over time you will be able to search for and link to most of the e-book titles in the library catalog (just like the print books).
  • Books that we are now purchasing in e-book format will no longer automatically ship to us in print on our approval plan; this does not apply to books by UNCC faculty.  If you want the library to also purchase the print version of particular books, you will need to submit your request(s) to either your library representative or subject librarian.
  • Fear not – there are no plans to remove the print books on the shelves!

Academic library e-book holdings have been on the rise over the last decade and this trend will continue to grow.  These collections are more affordable for libraries (freeing funds for additional electronic resources) and they provide greater access to our collection.

graph of ebooks stats in academic libraries

eBooks held at end of FY from Academic Library Statistics

In the next year, 20% of new book acquisitions at Atkins Library will be in e-book format.  If you have questions about how the e-books work and how to integrate them into your classes, please contact your subject librarian.

* The University of South Alabama University Library has created a useful guide to Using University Library Ebooks with Ereaders. Click on the tabs at the top to find instructions for the different types of e-readers.