Category: Digital Scholarship Lab

ICPSR Summer Institute

Registration for the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) 2014 Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research is now open.

The ICPSR Summer Program offers lectures and workshops in a wide variety of topics in research design, quantitative reasoning, statistical methods, and data processing. Many of these courses are presented in two four-week sessions held on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The first session runs from June 23-July 18, 2014. The second session runs from July 21-August 15, 2014.

From May through August, the ICPSR Summer Program also offers more than 35 three- to five-day workshops on both statistical and substantive topics. Many of these short workshops take place in Ann Arbor, but several are held in other locations, including Amherst, MA; Berkeley, CA; Boulder, CO; Chapel Hill, NC; Manhattan, NY; and Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Several noteworthy features of the 2014 Summer Program include:
•    A 15% discount on registration fees for returning Summer Program participants
•    A 15% discount on total registration fees when you register for two or more 3- to 5-day workshops (does not include sponsored substantive workshops)
•    A continuing emphasis on data science, network analysis, and multilevel modeling
•    Courses of special interest to diverse audiences, including “Methodological Issues in Quantitative Research on Race and Ethnicity,” “Collaborative Multi-Racial and Ethnic Political Survey,” and “The Pathways to Desistance Study: Analyzing the Life Event Calendar Data for Substance Abuse”
•    Several new 3- to 5-day workshops, including “Bayesian Methods for Prevention and Intervention Science” and “Latent Class Analysis in Social Science Research”
•    The new four-week workshop “Empirical Modeling for Theory Evaluation,” exploring EITM-themed materials

See below for a list of workshops offered at UNC Chapel Hill:

•    Analyzing Social Networks: An Introduction (August 4-8)
•    Mixed Methods: Approaches for Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Strategies (June 16-18)
•    Growth Mixture Models: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach (June 9-11)
•    Latent Growth Curve Models (LGCM): A Structural Equation Modeling Approach (June 2-6)

Registration is now open! You can find the course list and schedule at https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/sumprog/. UNC Charlotte is a member of ICPSR and therefore you can register at the member rate.

Several scholarships are available for graduate students to attend the four-week sessions (but not the workshops).  Additional funding opportunities may be available by individual departments or colleges on campus.

Source: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/files/sumprog/enewsletters/2014-02-17.html

Data Workshops

Below are upcoming workshops for UNC Charlotte faculty and graduate students.

Overview of the UNC Charlotte Data Repository
This session is for researchers who have data sets that they wish to publish and share.  The session will be primarily of interest to social science researchers.  There will be a short overview of the evolving concept of research data as a formal product of the research process.  We will briefly discuss methods for making data easy to find and share and citation of data sets.  The session includes an introduction and demonstration of the data repository that is supported at the UNC Charlotte library.

Wednesday, February 12, Atkins 273, 11 am – 12 pm Register

Learn about additional Digital Scholarship Lab workshops on author’s rights, copyright, publishing an open access journal with the library, and usability services: http://dsl.uncc.edu/dsl/events.

Navigating Census Data Sets
Project Mosaic, established by the University to enhance social and behavioral science research, will sponsor the workshop “Navigating Census Data Sets” at 3 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 13, in Atkins Library, Room 273. Registration is required.

Reese Manceaux from the Digital Scholarship Lab will lead this short course, which is an introduction to U.S. Census data sets. It will cover the following topics:

Introduction to the Decennial Census, the American Community Survey and the Population Estimates Program and the differences between these resources.  Participants will learn about different Census geographies and how to download the data

Introduction to using the American FactFinder.  Participants will learn about ACS estimates, when to use one-, three- or five-year estimates and how to access online maps

Short overview of other tools that use Census data: SimplyMap, DataFerrett, IPUMS, Geolytics CD data in the library

How to get FactFinder downloads into ArcGIS

Learn about additional Project Mosaic workshops on Stata, SAS, GIS, qualitative software, and more: https://projectmosaic.uncc.edu/calendar/2014-02.

Webinar: Resources for Health Research from ICPSR
This free webinar will provide information to Official Representatives, research scientists, faculty, and students about the wide variety of health-related data available from ICPSR. We will describe the kinds of data and other resources housed in our archive, how you can access them, and the tools available for statistical analyses.

Directors of the following specialized archives at ICPSR will discuss their mission, archival holdings, and research resources:

  • Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR)
  • Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA)
  • National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP)
  • National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA)
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA)

Wednesday, February 26, 4-5 PM ET. Learn more and register.

As a member of ICPSR, UNC Charlotte faculty, staff and students have full access to the ICPSR data archive.  Members also receive discounted tuition rates for ICPSR courses in quantitative methods of social research.  The schedule for the 2014 ICPSR Summer Program is now available: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/sumprog/.  Registration opens February 10.

Reading is Research

The following workshop is designed for instructors at UNC Charlotte.

Reading is Research:
Library-Faculty Collaboration for More Meaningful Research Instruction

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Atkins Library 125
2:00-3:00 pm
Please RSVP to Stephanie Otis (sotis@uncc.edu) if you plan to attend

What makes a good researcher? Knowing that the research process involves more than the search for information sources, what steps can we take to improve our students’ critical reading, thinking and writing abilities? This workshop will introduce a collaborative effort between Joyce Dalsheim (Global, International, and Area Studies) and Stephanie Otis (Atkins Library) to teach students the importance of critical reading in the research process and in independent learning.

Tracing backward through the research process most of us have come to take for granted, this workshop offers a set of strategies that shift the focus of research from “search” to “think” and from information gathering to in-depth reading. Dalsheim and Otis have developed a set of strategies for the classroom and for library instruction sessions to model and develop critical reading and thinking with students. The strategies are designed to promote the skills and confidence students need to become independent researchers. Based on a two-year collaborative project, Otis and Dalsheim will present an overview of their approach, and will also introduce specific strategies for honing students’ skills in critical reading and synthesizing material—the basic building blocks of good research. Participants will leave with ideas for incorporating these strategies into their own classes in partnership with the library.

GIS Workshops

Center for Applied Geographic Information Science (CAGIS)

The Center for Applied GIScience, the Atkins Library Digital Scholarship Lab, and the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Office of Academic Technologies are partnering to host a series of workshops on Friday, Nov. 22, in the Digital Scholarship Lab classroom (Atkins 273 – UNC Charlotte) to introduce faculty and graduate students to GIS tools and resources that they can use in their research.

Session 1: Introduction to GIS. This workshop will present an overview of GIS software and data. Participants will learn about the strengths of different GIS software packages for their research, the fundamental types of data that GIS software employs, and an overview of how to load and manipulate GIS data. By the end of this session, participants should have a basic understanding of the research and analytical tasks that GIS tools enable and begin to choose the tools that will work best for their specific research needs.

Friday, November 22, Atkins 273, 10 am – 11:30 am, Register

Session 2: Adding GIS Data to Your Research Project. This session focuses on combining data in GIS formats with other types of data that researchers in the social sciences commonly use. The instructor will demonstrate how to merge and join data in a range of GIS and non-GIS formats to produce integrated datasets that can they be analyzed with typical statistical tools. For example, the session will demonstrate how to join and analyze data at levels including individual addresses, ZIP codes, census tracts, and counties. By the end of this session, attendees will have skills to able to find and join their own data.

Friday, November 22, Atkins 273, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, Register

Session 3: Overview of Research Themes of Center for Applied GIScience. Led by Wenwu Tang, Assistant Professor, Director of Computing and Technology for the Center for Applied GIScience. An important goal of this session is to expose participants to the range of advanced research capabilities at CAGIS and to encourage discussions of research collaboration with faculty in other fields. By the end of this session, participants should have a good sense of the activities of CAGIS, be able to identify potential collaborators, and understand how CAGIS’ advances might contribute to their research. The Center’s strengths include: CyberGIS: Cyberinfrastructure-enabled high-performance computing (HPC) to accelerate spatial analysis and using state-of-the-art HPC resources to maximize efficiencies and increase research productivity; Big spatial data analytics; Space-time Modeling and GeoVisualization.

Friday, November 22, Atkins 273, 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm, Register

Case for Open Access

This week we celebrate Open Access Week on campus.  You may be wondering…

What is the case for open access publishing at UNC Charlotte?

Watch this quick video produced by Atkins Library, featuring UNC Charlotte University Librarian, Stanley Wilder, and Dr. Susan Arthur, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology, and Chair of the Faculty Advisory Library Committee at UNC Charlotte.

Have questions?

Visit Information Tables on Monday, October 21 between 10:30 and 12:30 at locations around campus (Atkins Library, Fretwell, CHHS, EPIC) to learn about open access, copyright, author rights, publishing agreements, federal funding requirements, and more.  Attend other open access week events on campus.

Learn more about the case for open access publishing at UNC Charlotte by visiting this Open Access Resources Page on the Atkins Library website.

Consider joining us for the Open Access Symposium on Monday, November 4 to become more engaged in this discussion on campus. Featured speakers include Pete Binfield, Co-founder and Publisher of PeerJ; David Hoole, Marketing Director of Nature; Della Sar, Director at Nature; Peggy Hoon, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Atkins Library; and a panel of UNC Charlotte faculty who have experience editing or publishing in open access publications.

Open Access Week

Open Access WeekOpen Access Week 2013 is a global event, now in its 6th year, that raises awareness and serves to promote open access in scholarship and research.  The Atkins Library Digital Scholarship Lab at UNC Charlotte is hosting several events during Open Access Week. All events are free and open to the public.

.

A two-day Open Access Symposium will follow Open Access Week, and will provide a forum for discussions relating to the open access movement. Day 1 of the symposium (November 4) is designed for UNC Charlotte faculty.

.

UNC Charlotte’s Open Access Data Repository
Event type: Information session
Date: Monday, October 21
Time: 2:00-2:45 pm
Location: Atkins 273
Presenter:  Reese Manceaux, Data Services Librarian and Coordinator
Description:  The session includes an introduction and demonstration of the open access data repository that is supported at the UNC Charlotte library.  The UNC Charlotte Data Repository is for social science researchers who have datasets they wish to publish and share. The session will be primarily of interest to social science researchers. There will be a short overview of the evolving concept of research data as a formal product of the research process.  We will briefly discuss methods for making data easy to find and share and citation of data sets.

Open Access:  Measuring Impact and Changing Scholarly Practices
Event type:  Webinar
Date: Monday, October 21
Time: 3:00-4:30 pm
Location: Atkins 273
Description:  This is the national kick-off event for Open Access Week.  This webinar is hosted by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the World Bank. The live event will be webcast from Washington, DC and will host a Liveblog and Webcast for those who cannot attend in person.   A panel will discuss the topic of article level metrics and the changing way scholarly communication is measured.

Researchers’ Guide to NIH Open Access Mandate
Event type: Information session
Date: Tuesday, October 22
Time: 10:00-11:00 am
Location: Fretwell 430C
Presenters: Peter Szanton, Associate Director of Sponsored Research, and Pam King, Director of Sponsored Research, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Description: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Office of Sponsored Research will present a NIH/PubMedCentral guide to assist faculty in compliance with the OA mandate attached to NIH grant funds.

Your Start-up Guide to Open Journal Publishing
Event type: Information session
Date: Wednesday, October 23
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Location: Atkins 273
Presenter: Heather McCullough, Ph.D., Head of Digital Scholarship
Description:  If you want to publish an open access journal, the library can help you.  Open Journal System (OJS) is a full-featured content management system for managing all steps in the process of editing and publishing an open access peer-reviewed journal.  See a demonstration of this library service and learn about the support available for scholarly publishing.

Conversation with Peter Suber, Harvard Office of Scholarly Communications
Event type: Web conference
Date: Wednesday, October 23
Time: 2:00-3:15 pm
Location: Atkins 273
Presenter: Peter Suber, Ph.D.
Description: Join us for an interactive discussion with Peter Suber, Director of the Harvard Office of Scholarly Communications and author of Open Access (MIT Press, 2012).  Attendees can submit questions and comments in real time during the session.

Introduction to Open Access and Copyright
Event type: Information session
Date: Friday, October 25
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Location: Atkins 273
Presenter:  Peggy Hoon, J.D., Scholarly Communication Librarian
Description:  What is open access and why is it a superior model for sharing research?  Gain a better understanding of open access, copyright, and alternative licensing.

Source: http://library.uncc.edu/node/13302

UNCC Data Repository

Dataverse Network Project

The UNC Charlotte Atkins Library Dataverse Network is a web-based application to store, publish, share, reference, cite, download, and analyze social science research data. It facilitates making data available to researchers and others. Data authors, publishers, and affiliated institutions all get credit.

Managing research data is a growing interest and concern for researchers as funding agencies move to requiring data management plans in all proposals. NIH has required data sharing plans in their grant proposals since 2003. The NSF released requirements that went into effect in 2011 for their grant proposals to include data management plans. The Dataverse is a solution that satisfies those and other agencies.

A Dataverse Network hosts multiple dataverses. Each dataverse contains studies or collections of studies, and each study contains metadata in addition to the actual data files and corresponding files. The UNC Charlotte data repository resides on the secure and backed-up Dataverse network server at the Odum Institute at UNC Chapel Hill.

The Dataverse Network holds about 40,000 studies with about 720,000+ data files. You can browse or search across all dataverses, and then download the data and complimentary files of studies that you are interested in or would like to replicate. For some datasets, you can download a subset of variables and cases in multiple formats, or perform on-line preliminary analysis using various statistical models. You can also add comments about the data to each study.

Check out the UNC Charlotte Data Collection and consider publishing your own data in the repository.  Questions can be directed to Reese Manceaux in the Atkins Library Digital Scholarship Lab (704-687-1114 or ramancea@uncc.edu).

Bonnie Cone: Voices from the Archive

The following video is a tribute to UNC Charlotte founder Bonnie Cone and her vision for the university.  The video was created by UNC Charlotte Special Collections using interviews and archival materials from the collection.

.

Bonnie Cone: Voices from the Archive was created in conjunction with a physical and online exhibit, Bonnie Cone: Educator, Trailblazer, Visionary.

The physical exhibit is on display at J. Murrey Atkins Library, UNC Charlotte between June and December 2013. The online exhibit can be accessed at Bonniecone.uncc.edu.

Interviews with and about Bonnie Cone can be accessed on Special Collections’ website, New South Voices.

Special Collections is interested in your stories about Miss Bonnie, Charlotte College and UNC Charlotte. To add your voice to the archive, please contact:

Special Collections
J. Murrey Atkins Library, UNC Charlotte
Tel: 704.687.1170
Email: spec-coll@uncc.edu

Source: http://youtu.be/mypXjoFsHk4

Data Workshops

New machine to speed up statistics of census of 1940. Washington, D.C., Dec. 2. Harris & Ewing Collection (Library of Congress)

Workshops provided by Atkins Library Digital Scholarship Lab.  Click HERE for a full list of DSL workshops offered this semester.

Overview of the UNC Charlotte Data Repository 
This session is for researchers who have data sets that they wish to publish and share.  The session will be primarily of interest to social science researchers.  There will be a short overview of the evolving concept of research data as a formal product of the research process.  We will briefly discuss methods for making data easy to find and share and citation of data sets.  The session includes an introduction and demonstration of the data repository that is supported at the UNC Charlotte library.

  • Thurs., February 7, Atkins 273, 2-3 pm, Register
  • Weds., March 13, Atkins 273, 11 am-12 pm, Register
  • Tues., April 9, Atkins 273, 2-3 pm, Register

Introduction to Data Resources (for Social Sciences)
This session will provide participants with an overview of the library’s online statistical resources (Census Factfinder, ICPSR datasets, GIS resources). Learn how to download this data into SPSS and ArcMap and incorporate it into your presentations/projects.

  • Tues., January 22, Atkins 273, 2-3 pm, Register
  • Thurs., January 31, Atkins 273, 11 am – 12 pm, Register
  • Thurs., February 28, Atkins 273, 2-3 pm, Register

Introduction to GIS
Learn some of the basic concepts of GIS (Geographic Information Systems), finding geospatial data, and be familiar with some of the basic functions of ArcGIS 10 to create your own thematic maps. Adding data and layers, showing data with symbology, labeling features, and working with attribute tables will be covered.

  • Weds., February 13, Atkins 273, 3-4 pm, Register
  • Thurs., March 14,  Atkins 273, 2-3 pm, Register

Special Collections Workshops

Workshops provided by Atkins Library Digital Scholarship Lab.  Click HERE for a full list of DSL workshops offered this semester.

Incorporating Special Collections Content into your Digital Scholarship
Atkins Library has splendid collection of rare books, manuscripts, university archives, oral histories, and local documents, and born-digital materials that are available for use by researchers.  These sessions provide an overview of our collections for researchers seeking original research materials for research and for use in digital scholarship projects.